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Douglas Greene
July 6th, 2004, 06:22 PM
Wyatt

I've read a couple novels by Fortune du Boisgobey--very much in the
Gaboriau style -- in fact, he appropriated Gaboriau's sleuth and wrote a
book called THE OLD AGE OF LECOQ -- plots involve skeletons in Ducal
closets, but they tend to lack the careful following of physical cluses
that Lecoq engages in in MONSIEUR LECOQ and THE HONOR OF THE NAME.

Xavier, do you agree?

Doug

Douglas G. Greene
Professor of History
Old Dominion University
Norfolk, VA 23529-0091
Phone 757 683-394

MG4273@aol.com
July 6th, 2004, 07:45 PM
There are reviews of two books by this author on my web site, at:
http://members.aol.com/MG4273/gaboriau.htm#Boisgobey

Both books are minor; they might be far from his most important works.

Mike Grost

Wyatt James
July 6th, 2004, 08:22 PM
I am not fond of French Roman Policiers, although I like British and
American Procedurals. Go figure..... It could be I have an assumption
that French police just say, a la Inspector Clouseau, "arrest that man
and place him in the dungeon until he confesses." Yeah, the cops here
in the 1920s used third-degree methods and the Brits are known to have
mangled suspects, but there was always that degree of 'politeness'
when it came to providing legal advice, and releasing somebody if they
weren't going to be held on a charge. (Of course that does not apply
any more in the US if you are an Arab without citizenship rights.)

--- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, MG4273@a... wrote:
> There are reviews of two books by this author on my web site, at:
> http://members.aol.com/MG4273/gaboriau.htm#Boisgobey
>
> Both books are minor; they might be far from his most important works.
>
> Mike Grost

Xavier Lechard
July 7th, 2004, 06:43 AM
--- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Douglas Greene <dgreene@o...>
wrote:
> I've read a couple novels by Fortune du Boisgobey--very much in the
> Gaboriau style -- in fact, he appropriated Gaboriau's sleuth and
wrote a
> book called THE OLD AGE OF LECOQ -- plots involve skeletons in Ducal
> closets, but they tend to lack the careful following of physical
cluses
> that Lecoq engages in in MONSIEUR LECOQ and THE HONOR OF THE NAME.
>
> Xavier, do you agree?

I'm afraid I'll have to leave this one up to you, Doug, as I have
never read any of Boisgobey's works. Most of them have been out of
print for decades and French mystery publisher Rivages's attempt at
bringing back to the light by reprinting semi-parodical LE COUP
D'OEIL DE MONSIEUR PIEDOUCHE was a commercial failure. Actually, and
as "unpatriotic" as it may seem, early French crime fiction has never
been my kind of tea, as it too often is crude, melodramatic and
loosely plotted. The only exception I can think of is the unfairly
neglected Henry Cauvain, whose amateur sleuth Maximilien Heller is a
quite interesting character, though by no means the proto-Holmes some
Gallic sherlockians claim him to be.

Friendly,
Xavier